Top Tourist Attractions in England

Top Tourist Attractions in England

Big Ben –

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London and is usually extended to refer to both the clock and the clock tower. The Houses of Parliament and Elizabeth Tower, commonly called Big Ben, are among London’s most iconic landmarks and must-see London attractions. Technically, Big Ben is the name given to the massive bell inside the clock tower, which weighs more than 13 tons (13,760 kg). The clock tower looks spectacular at night when the four clock faces are illuminated.

Blenheim Palace

Blenheim Palace is a monumental English country house situated in the civil parish of Blenheim near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. A masterpiece of Baroque architecture, Blenheim Palace provides an awe-inspiring experience for visitors. Home to the 12th Duke of Marlborough and his family and the birth place of Sir Winston Churchill, Blenheim Palace is a UNESCO World Heritage Site boasting a long and diverse history.

British Museum

Founded in 1753, the British Museum’s remarkable collection spans over two million years of human history. Enjoy a unique comparison of the treasures of world cultures under one roof, centred around the magnificent Great Court. The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture. World-famous objects such as the Rosetta Stone, Parthenon sculptures, and Egyptian mummies are visited by up to six million visitors per year. In addition to the vast permanent collection, the museum’s special exhibitions, displays and events are all designed to advance understanding of the collection and cultures they represent.

Durham Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly known as Durham Cathedral and home of the Shrine of St Cuthbert, is a cathedral in the city of Durham. Durham Cathedral was built in the late 11th and early 12th centuries to house the relics of St Cuthbert (evangelizer of Northumbria) and the Venerable Bede. It attests to the importance of the early Benedictine monastic community and is the largest and finest example of Norman architecture in England. The innovative audacity of its vaulting foreshadowed Gothic architecture. Behind the cathedral stands the castle, an ancient Norman fortress which was the residence of the prince-bishops of Durham.

Georgian City of Bath

Founded by the Romans as a thermal spa, Bath became an important centre of the wool industry in the Middle Ages. In the 18th century, under George III, it developed into an elegant town with neoclassical Palladian buildings, which blend harmoniously with the Roman baths.

Hadrian’s Wall

Hadrian’s Wall, also called the Roman Wall, Picts’ Wall, or Vallum Hadriani in Latin, was a defensive fortification in the Roman province of Britannia, begun in AD 122 in the reign of the emperor Hadrian.

Historic Yorkshire

This region formed what was historically the largest county in England and today the county of North Yorkshire still holds that honour. The abbeys, viewpoints and smaller, more intimate dales of the North York Moors are equally fine in the Jurrassic country to the east. The big difference here is that we have the added bonus of the coast. At Whitby we find it all – the ruined abbey, the dale of the Esk emptying its waters into the sea, the scenery, the history and the fish and chips.

Lake District

The Lake District (or Lakeland, as it’s commonly known round these parts) is by far the UK’s most popular national park. Every year, some 15 million people pitch up to explore the region’s fells and countryside, and it’s not hard to see why. Ever since the Romantic poets arrived in the 19th century, its postcard panorama of craggy hilltops, mountain tarns and glittering lakes has been stirring the imaginations of visitors. Since 2017 it has also been a Unesco World Heritage Site, in recognition of its uinque hill-farming culture.

London Eye

The London Eye, known for sponsorship reasons as the Coca-Cola London Eye, is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. The structure is 135 metres tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres.  London Eye is centrally located in the heart of the capital, gracefully rotating over the River Thames opposite the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben.  London Eye is the world’s tallest cantilevered observation wheel a feat of design and engineering. The experience showcases breathtaking 360-degree views of the capital and its famous landmarks and has been the number one visitor experience in the city for the past decade. Within each capsule, interactive guides allow you to explore the capital’s iconic landmarks in several languages.

Other Attractions –

  • Natural History Museum
  • St. Paul’s Cathedral
  • Stonehenge
  • The Cotswolds
  • The Roman Baths
  • Tower of London
  • Warwick Castle
  • Westminster Abbey
  • Windsor Castle
  • York Minster
June 9, 2018 / by / in , , , ,

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